From Students to Staff! A 25th Anniversary Special!
Published on 13 Jul 2017

Then & Now: Quick! Can you spot the familiar faces?

 

It’s our 25th Anniversary! And in this special series (watch out for more to come!), we will be featuring 25 of our staff who were once students in NYP!

These are a pretty special bunch of people, who can say that they have experience on both sides of the coin. So here are our first five profiles! We quizzed them on their student days and this is what they had to say.

Caroline Chu, Senior Lecturer, School of Health Sciences

Graduated in 1996, Diploma in Nursing
 

1) What do you remember of your time in NYP when you were a student?

I was always seated in the first row in the LTs and tutorial rooms, actively copying notes during lessons. A typical Kiasu student. Breaks between classes were always about buying snacks from the Outram campus canteen or the mamak shop at the School of Nursing.
 

2) What kind of student were you? (choose one that most closely fits, or at least, you want to be remembered as!)

Total bookworm 

• Sporty and super active

• Fun-loving party animal

• Super shy and never spoke up
 

2) When and why did you come back to NYP as a staff member?

2003. I love to teach. This probably came from how I enjoyed sharing my knowledge and skills with my colleagues when I was working in a hospital. 

Since NYP was the only institution that offered Nursing as a course back then, I naturally returned as a lecturer. After 14 years of teaching, my passion and motivation in teaching diploma and advanced diploma students has not waned. It really gives me a great sense of satisfaction and achievement when I see my ex-students doing well in their clinical practice. They also remember me and show their appreciation whenever I see them at clinicals. Many become friends.

Although the relationships established are not part of the “teaching package”, they are definitely to be treasured.

Sharon Faith Khoo, Senior Lecturer, School of Business Management

Graduated in 1999, Diploma in Banking and Financial Management
 

1) What do you remember of your time in NYP when you were a student?

For the first two years of our time at NYP, my classmates and I led a nomadic life, moving from Tiong Bahru campus in one semester to Bukit Merah campus in the following semester while waiting for the Ang Mo Kio campus to be ready.  Despite not having a proper home, campus life was still pretty vibrant then as we would see local singers making campus visits to promote their new albums every now and then.  Kit Chan was one of them.  After we moved to our beautiful campus, we felt like the most fortunate students on earth.  Everything was brand new and modern!  As the pioneer batch of students occupying the new campus, we undoubtedly benefitted from all the new facilities. 

 

2) What kind of student were you? (choose one that most closely fits, or at least, you want to be remembered as!)

·         Total bookworm

·         Sporty and super active

·         Fun-loving party animal

·         Super shy and never spoke up

None of the above. I was diligent but would not consider myself a total bookworm. Was hopeless at sports.  In my second year, I worked towards a more balanced student life by pursuing one of my interests -- singing.  A group of like-minded course mates and I started a new CCA – a singing club for solo vocalists.  We named our club ‘Vocals de Soul’. I was not into parties.  However, my classmates and I would chill out next door at The Grassroots Club after our major assignments and exams.  Our students are much luckier now because they don’t have to spend a single cent with the entertainment facilities at T-Junction. As for being shy, I was the Class Rep for three whole years (thanks to my class!), and had to be the spokesperson for everyone for every matter.

 

3) When and why did you come back to NYP as a staff member?

Prior to joining NYP, I was teaching in my alma mater, which provided me with ten wonderful years of primary and secondary school education.  

Then, I felt it was time to make a contribution to my other school – NYP.  Being able to give back professionally to the institution that enriched my learning is an extraordinary privilege.  The lyrics from two of Kit Chan’s National Day songs best express my thoughts: “There’s no place I’d rather be” and “for this is where I know it’s home”.  

Shawn Soh, 41, Assistant Manager, School of Health Sciences (Allied Health)

Graduated in 2000, Diploma in Physiotherapy
 

1) What do you remember of your time in NYP when you were a student?

I enrolled in 1997 and was in the 6th batch of Physiotherapy students, I was fortunate to have been taught by the local faculty and the international faculty from University of Sydney. Some of the personal anecdotes shared by the faculty to illustrate the importance of Physiotherapy greatly inspired me. One memorable and inspirational sharing session was about providing low back pain rehabilitation for one of the all-time greatest actors, Pierce Brosnan. I am sure his fans would not have enjoyed another great James Bond movie without my lecturer’s effective pain-relieving manipulation technique.

 

2) What kind of student were you? (choose one that most closely fits, or at least, you want to be remembered as!)

·         Total bookworm

·         Sporty and super active

·         Fun-loving party animal

·         Super shy and never spoke up

None of the above. Sure, I would like to be remembered as the coolest, smartest and friendliest dude in the school.  A bloke performing at the peak of his academic studies. But really, Physiotherapy is an extremely tough course. I needed to survive by absorbing chunks of academic knowledge and avoid clinical uncertainties, which are landmines. Yes really. I was just praying that “Tomorrow Never Dies”.

 

3) Why and when did you come back to NYP as a staff member?

I joined NYP in 2013. I have shared with my students that there are two ways to learn. One way is to go through the hard knocks personally and don’t make similar mistakes in the future. The second way is to learn through others, which helps to shorten the learning curve.
 

NYP is a wonderful platform to share my healthcare experiences.  In doing so, I hope to inspire our future physiotherapists to adopt the view of “The World Is Not Enough” and embrace a meaningful career in Physiotherapy. I hope to continue to positively influence the healthcare sector, which I may one day seek rehabilitation help from.

Louise Khng, Lecturer, School of Business Management

Class of 2002, Diploma in Sports & Wellness Management
 

1) What do you remember of your time in NYP when you were a student?

For a particular lecturer, we always had to ensure that tutorials had to be completed (even if it meant coming to school at 7am to get it done). We also had to be super prepared for questions during classes (otherwise you would remain standing until you are able to answer). Lastly, we had to be absolutely early for lessons. If we were unable to complete the above, all of us would run the risk of being marked absent or locked out of the classroom. I’ve had classmates who had their mobile phones confiscated for the week because it rang during lessons; some of them also had to contribute $1 to the class fund for yawning with their mouths wide opened. 
 

Despite these rules, no one ever complained. Even though it may seem like dreaded memories, my friends and I will always remember this individual (also our PEM) whom we hold in highest regard. Reason being, throughout the three years, we were shown the care, concern, and guidance we needed and instilled with important life values that we would always remember. 

 

2) What kind of student were you? (choose one that most closely fits, or at least, you want to be remembered as!)

  • Total bookworm
  • Sporty and super active
  • Fun-loving party animal
  • Super shy and never spoke up. I only spoke up at appropriate times. I basically ‘flew under the radar’ as an average Jane, but I was also sporty.
     

3) Why and when did you come back to NYP as a staff member?

I came back in 2014. I felt that I would be able to relate to the students and share my experiences with them especially since I am back teaching in the same course I graduated from. I enjoyed poly life and hope to be able to provide a similar environment for my students. Additionally, I hope to continue to incorporate life values into lessons (as I have experienced) and engage in fruitful daily interactions with students. 

Ong Ming Da Amdy, 30, Technical Support Officer, School of Health Sciences

Class of 2006, Diploma in Oral Health Therapy

 

1) What do you remember of your time in of NYP when you were a student?

Once we had a 2-hour break, and the whole class went for a bowling session at the Grassroots Club. Well, we underestimated the time needed and the next thing that happened was 27 students were running from Grassroots club to NYP. Eventually, we were 15-mins late and our lecturer was furious! In our defence, we argued that it was a great class bonding session. Obviously, our lecturer did not buy it. =P

 

2) What kind of student were you? (choose one that most closely fits, or at least, you want to be remembered as!)

The funny one. But a failed funny one.

 

3) Why and when did you come back to NYP as a staff member?

I joined NYP in 2014.  As I was in the pioneer batch of the course, there was no one who could advise us on our career. It did not take much to decide to join when the opportunity came knocking. Armed with years of experience in the profession, I wanted to come back and share all that with our students, and impart what I have learnt.
 

Another reason would be that as an active alumni member, I deal a lot with NYP and always felt that connection. Now after three years here, it does feel like home :-)

Lim Sze Yang, 36, Lecturer, School of Interactive & Digital Media

Graduated in 2005, Diploma in Digital Media Design
 

1) What do you remember of your time in NYP when you were a student?

We were filming a short film inspired from "The Matrix" for our assignment, and we were hogging Blk K's corridor at level 4 to film a chase scene, complete with an improvised camera trolley (cargo trolley) and dripping ice-cream.

We filmed the finale fight scene on the roof of Blk K as well, shamelessly requesting all lecturers to keep their students from coming out to disrupt our filming. My peers were dressed in black trench coats or suits for this, and we orchestrated our punching, kicking, and somersaulting skills. It was fun during those days.

 

2) What kind of student were you? (choose one that most closely fits, or at least, you want to be remembered as!)

  • Total bookworm
  • Sporty and super active
  • Fun-loving party animal
  • Super shy and never spoke up
     

3) When and why did you come back to NYP as a staff member?

2005. I loved my experience in NYP, and I wanted to teach and share my knowledge in a place I love, along with the staff who have taught me.

Cindy Chiah, 32, Business Development Executive, Singapore Institute of Retail Studies

Graduated in 2005, Diploma in Business Management
 

1) What do you remember of your time in NYP when you were a student?

I remember looking for an empty tutorial room to slack during breaks. I remember looking for an available computer to use on project submission day. I remember the ever happy McDonald’s aunty who likes Mickey Mouse and goes around to take our ice cream orders.

I remember skipping any class that was after a 4-hour break or held at night, around 7pm. The fruit juice at north canteen was the best. The most delicious goreng pisang at north canteen comes out at 3pm.

 

2) What kind of student were you? (choose one that most closely fits, or at least, you want to be remembered as!)

  • Total bookworm
  • Sporty and super active
  • Fun-loving party animal
  • Super shy and never spoke up

None of the above. I come for class, stay low-key and leave immediately after class for part-time work. I was not really shy since I was the class rep.
 

3) When and why did you come back to NYP as a staff member?

2010. Never a push factor. Had good memories through my poly days. 

Cynthia Ngian, 40, Specialist, Communications & Outreach

Graduated in 1996, Diploma in Nursing
 

1) What do you remember of your time in NYP when you were a student?

Dozing off in class, doodling on notes, using wheelchair & clutches to race along the nursing lab corridor with my classmates during one of the nursing practical lessons.


2) What kind of student were you? (choose one that most closely fits, or at least, you want to be remembered as!)

  • Total bookworm
  • Sporty and super active
  • Fun-loving party animal
  • Super shy and never spoke up

None of the above. I was the Kiasu type – I would copy all notes during my lessons and from fellow classmates. But I tried to keep a low profile so the lecturer won’t call me up in class.
 

3) When and why did you come back to NYP as a staff member?

2003. After working as a registered nurse in a tertiary hospital for 7 years, I heeded the calling to teach. It was a fulfilling 13 years developing the next generation of nurses – journeying together with my ex-students and ex-mentees in their professional development and personal milestones.

During my years of teaching in NYP, I noticed some students who made some mistakes in their choice of course as they did not know what to choose. Some students ended their pain early and managed to switch course in Year 1. Some students were indecisive and made a career switch only after graduation. This led me to my current department – Communications & Outreach. I hope to reach out to more secondary schools students and help them make informed and discerning choices in their post-secondary school options
.

Sathish Balu, 35, Lecturer, School of Chemical & Life Sciences

Graduated in 2006, Diploma in Molecular Biotechnology
 

1) What do you remember of your time in of NYP when you were a student?

This is the place where many friendships were forged and they have stood the test of time.
 

2) What kind of student were you? (choose one that most closely fits, or at least, you want to be remembered as!)

  • Total bookworm
  • Sporty and super active
  • Fun-loving party animal
  • Super shy and never spoke up
     

3) When and why did you come back to NYP as a staff member?

2013. I always had a very strong sense of belonging in NYP. The numerous late nights, the laughter, the fun and the horsing around made me feel comfortable and at home in NYP. I never felt I was in school. Coming back to NYP was like coming back home. It just felt so normal.

Lim Siow Ting, 26, Development Engineer, School of Engineering

Graduated in 2011, Diploma in Digital & Precision Engineering
 

1) What do you remember of your time in of NYP when you were a student?

I cannot really sing well, I have stage fright, but I mustered up the courage to take part in a singing audition organised by SoundCard. Results? No go. But YOLO.

2) What kind of student were you? (choose one that most closely fits, or at least, you want to be remembered as!)

  • Total bookworm
  • Sporty and super active
  • Fun-loving party animal
  • Super shy and never spoke up

Back then, I was the “total bookworm + shy” type of student in class and I was the solutions-provider in the class for most labs and tutorials. But I was not always shy, I was “active” in CCA, and always stayed up late hanging around club rooms at Block E.
 

3. When and why did you come back to NYP as a staff member?

It’s a secret.